A Drum n Bass troupe, a brazillian band, an aspiring tabla and bansuri player, a classically trained jazz musician are just a few of the people that have gone into making Walk Skip Run Glide a possibility.

AV: Its not everyday you hear someone American using South Asian influences and instrumentation in their music. So tell us when did you guys get started with this idea?
WSRG: Well actually my little brother is adopted from Cochin, Trivandrum in the early 80’s. At the time I figured it would be best if I read up a little bit on my future brother's culture. Then for his high school graduation my family and I went to visit India and Nepal. There I had the opportunity to see Zakir Hussein. Before this I hadn’t even seen a tabla. I was so blown away by the music that I went out and got a set of tablas right away and started to play around with them. I have never been really good at them but from then on I incorporated them into everything I did.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
More about this Artist

Aki Nawaz and Dave Watts of Fundamental and Nation Records sit down and share their views about life, liberty and persuit of good music.

AV: First lets talk about the history of things - How did nation records and Fundamental get set up?
Aki: Well Nation got set up to take world music and make it more accessible to club culture; rather than the coffee table mature academics. So the main purpose was to do that but, at the same time as I was running the record label and I thought it would be great idea to get together an Asian band which was very politically charged. Initially I gave the idea to Talvin - I was managing him at the time but he, obviously of a different generation, was very political but just not in a very musical sense. Then luckily, somebody offered me this big concert at the Notting Hill Carnival and we had five days to get it together. So, we decided to form Fundamental, wrote six or seven tracks, took loads of things - gelled them all together and just went and performed. And, the response was absolutely brilliant. Then as time went on we got Transglobal Underground, Loop Guru, Asian Dub Foundation and we got really active. In the sense that we weren't just putting out records but were actually going out doing concerts and setting up live shows. They weren't just normal shows either, you'd get all the cultural elements and the political elements there on stage. It was really challenging the system which for a long time had put us down and insulted us.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
More about this Artist

DJ Siraiki - A pioneer in New York’s South Asian electronica scene has spent close to a decade building audiences around this music, as well as creating ties across the Atlantic to artists on the British Asian Scene. His co-created, ground-breaking almost five year old club night Mutiny has opened doors for new artists and brought in some of the godfathers over stateside for a visit. Here is half of an over dinner interview that lasted about 75minutes. So, be advised its huge :).


AV: How did you get started in this music, where did the interests develop - how did all come about?
S: I grew up in US at the older edge of the second generation and the music that I grew up with was punk rock and 70’s reggae. Those music styles were formative for me, they helped me articulate who I was and gain a political voice. Reggae appealed to me because I had grown up in a household where I had been brought up with a clear sense of Indian colonial history and anti-colonial struggles. It had a third world identity, contained anti-colonial politics and, when you listen to a lot of the tracks from the seventies coming out of Jamaica, there were often references to India and other parts of the world that were decolonizing or had recently decolonized. That music dovetailed with the way that I was brought up and taught to think about my own connection to India. Along with that, punk rock had an energy and intensity that I was looking for and I really connected with. The whole do - it - yourself (DIY) aesthetic was so central to punk rock. It was all about subverting the music at that time; if you had something to say you just formed a band or just started a magazine - so that is something I connected to. There was also this turning point for me when I was 12 years old - one night while watching the nightly news there was a segment about the Sex Pistols while they were touring the US. At the end of the news report there are these two guys from the Sex Pistols and an NBC reporter trying to interview them; they are basically messing with the reporter - there was just this energy and irreverence that I totally connected with - as a 12 year everything got transformed with me and after that I heard Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols the first sex pistols album and that just transformed things to a new level.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
More about this Artist

Cheb i Sabbah started spinning in Paris during 1964, and by 1968 had hooked up with The Living Theatre where he made some of the earliest attempts at turning the spinning of discs into an art form. Then in the late '80s he became a fixture on the club scene in San Francisco through his 1001 Nights. In recent history he has released two albums Shri Durga and Mahamaya - and is now in the process of releasing Krishna Lila. A man with so much experience and talent and yet, he actually responded to my request for an interview. I couldn't believe it. So here it is, ENJOY!

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

A man with "six hands" as OuterSound.com called him. Well here we have it, he is finally sitting down and discussing his beginnings, his background and his musical interests. It's this that has created the musical diaspora that he showcases when he gets you nodding your head and shaking your ass at that last Mutiny.

AV: How did you get started with Mutiny? How did you get involved with this project?
Nav: For Mutiny I came in as a guest in December of '98. I basically didn't know about it until a month before Talvin was coming, and I went to go see him at the Knitting Factory. I knew Rekha from Basement Bhangra because I used to go to it. So when I saw them at the Knitting Factory, I heard Vivek (Siraiki) spinning some really dope beats and I realized that I had a lot of those tracks myself, I thought "I spin a lot of those tracks also" so I went up to Rekha and told her that "I would totally like to spin at [Mutiny]." She asked me for a demo and actually I had a mix tape on me right there, I gave it to her and asked her to let me know what she thought. The very next day she called me up and said that her and Vivek really liked the demo and wanted to know if I would want to do the next Mutiny as a guest.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive