More about this Artist

If you guys noticed, that in the last update the radio got some new music by an artist named latrama. Well recently I was able to talk him into giving us his views about his music, his origins and the "asian" movement at large.

AV: How did your interest South Asian fusion get started? Its not every day that a composer from spain is using South Asian instruments in his music.
L: Well I'll try to tell you something about "the beginning" of this musical project called "latrama," in as little words as possible. I hadn't been interested in electronic music and gear for a long time when I discovered the album 'New Forms' (roni size / reprazent) and I was amazed with the freshness of their rhythms and atmospheres.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

This article is provided to you by an article exchange with theinder.net

> : "Asian Underground" ? Do you think this is the suitable word for your style of music or is it more a phrase, created by the media ?
Shri: It´s a term invented by the media to insert it into a special group of music styles. We can´t stand the word "Asian Underground" at all, ´cause it simply doesn´t skate around our style of music. We aren´t in the underground scene and haven´t gigs in so - called underground clubs, but rather in locations like the "Royal Hall". Moreover most people think - if somebody uses the word "Asian Underground" - only Asian styles are used and only Asian artists works together. On the contrary we have played already together with Massive Attack, Björk and Hefner. We play in the same section but most of the time our records and those of other Asian artists are put in the branch of "Foreign Music". This is totally nonsense. They easily can be compared with the records of Massive Attack.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

TJ Rehmi, producer, dj, artist, musician extraordinaire agreed to conduct an interview with AsianVibrations.com and after some cajoling he opened up about his secretive life very nicely. Enjoy!

AV: Would you liken the Asian Music / Underground / Fusion movement that has grown (to a degree) out of Britain to Rap/Hip Hop in America? Being that South Asians are a big minority in Britain, just as African-Americans are here.
TJ: Yes and no. There are obvious stylistic differences based on cultural background but also similarities in attitude and in the usage of technology, breakbeats and heavy bass lines.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Mo Magic, pioneering East London Asian Breakbeat Fusion Artist and DJ is widely known for his inclusion on the now classic Outcaste New Breed album. His tracks like " Feelings ", "China Doll" and "Mixed Visions" are very soulful drum and bass tunes and you would think this guy´s really into it - and he is! But, as you dig a little deeper,there´s funky stuff like Emotional Breakdown", "Down Town" or the crazy "Funksta" to be found, all filled with well selected input from the homelands. Obviously he is a very talented young man who works in different musical soundscapes from dubby Downbeat things to Funk to Drum and Bass. His first release was a funky santoor/flute breakbeat track called "Enchanted 94", on an east london comiplation titled Cultural Fusions in 1994 that also incooperated the original mix of Osmani Soundz "Spirtual Masterkey" (not the Anokha version) and a track from an embryonic State of Bengal. From thereon he worked his way up appearing on several other Asian Breaks compilations like Swaraj and DubXoticethnofunkadelia and as DJ in the London club scene before he signed up with Outcaste Records. After listening to Mo's music and spinning it to great success at parties in germany since a few years, I thought it was about time to contact him and find out a bit more of who he is and what he is into, so read the interview I did with Mo Magic.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

This is a of the chat that me and Karsh had, while having coffee in Manhattan. The recording was 41 minutes long, so as you can imagine - this is an edited version.

AV - Growing up in western culture most south Asians are very into r&b, hip hop etc. How did you veer off from that and go into South Asian music?
KK - Well, I actually grew up playing drums and listening to rock and classical music. Being a drummer took me on a lot of different explorations through different styles of music. I explored hip-hop through the perspective of a drummer and a musician. But, when electronic music hit me, a meeting place for it and the Indian classical music came about. Electronic music has two elements that Indian classical music is played with, pure rhythm and melody. So it lays down a really nice foundation for the merging of the two styles.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive